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  • Field Studies
    Recent Field Studies
    Completed Field Studies
    Lowe, B.S., D.J. Delehanty, and J. Connelly. 2006. Greater sage-grouse use of threetip sagebrush and a potential technique to improve population parameters. Idaho State University. Pocatello, ID.

    Abstract:  Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) populations have declined due to decreased or degraded sagebrush habitats. Disturbances that change the sagebrush-steppe community may have an impact on sage-grouse populations. Increasing fire frequency is an example of a disturbance that can rapidly alter the sagebrush-steppe community. The impact that fires have on sage-grouse may be lessened by seeding burned areas immediately following a fire. This study examined the use of threetip sagebrush (Artemisia tripartita) by sage-grouse as nest cover and was conducted in Laidlaw Park in the Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve in south-central Idaho. Threetip sagebrush is one of few species of sagebrush that will sprout following fire. Sage-grouse use threetip sagebrush as nest cover less than expected based on random vegetation samples. The only other species of sagebrush used as nest cover was big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata). Sage-grouse that used big sagebrush as nest cover had greater nest success than those using threetip sagebrush, but the difference in success was confounded by sage of sage-grouse females. Efforts to conserve or increase sage-grouse populations have included restoring degraded sage-grouse habitat. Restoration has included seeding shrubs, grasses, and forbs used by sage-grouse following fires. Seeding influenced habitat use by sage0grouse. Sage-grouse used seeded and burned areas during summer more than expected and used control areas less than expected. However, there was no difference between the number of observed and expected nests in each of the three cover categories.

    Completed Field Studies


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    Lowe, B.S., D.J. Delehanty, and J. Connelly. 2006. Greater sage-grouse use of threetip sagebrush and a potential technique to improve population parameters. Idaho State University. Pocatello, ID.
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    Newlon, KR. and Saab, V. 2004. Influences of livestock grazing on populations and habitats of Lewis's woodpecker and other migratory landbirds breeding in aspen riparian woodlands. Rocky Mountain Research Station USFS. Bozeman, MT.
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    Newlon, K.R. 2004. Demography of Lewis's Woodpecker, breeding bird densities, and riparian aspen integrity in a grazed landscape. Master's Thesis. Montana State University. Bozeman, MT.
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    Paige, L.C. 2005. Bird Survey of Riparian and Wetland Areas. Ravenworks Ecology. Stevensville, MT.
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    Rich, T. 2005. Long term changes in breeding bird populations and habitat, Laidlaw Park, Craters of the Moon National Monument, ID. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Boise, ID.
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    Rust, S.K., J.J. Miller, C.L. Coulter, A.C. Hardman, and M.C. Russell. 2005. Inventory and Assessment of Upland Vegetation: Southern Pioneer Mountain. Idaho Conservation Data Center. Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Boise, ID.
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    P. O. Box 2249 • Hailey, Idaho 83333 • Phone 208.788.1378 • Fax 208.788.1264 • info@lavalakeinstitute.org
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